What do we see when we see dance what do we feel when we dance who are we when we are part of an enactment of dance the phenomenon of dance brings to the fore key ideas about the nature of human meaning-making the role of our fundamentally corporeal actions in the world and the foundational aspects of our experiences. Dance i contend holds immense promise as an object for study as well as a subject of study that is a source of insight in itself shedding light on life movement and meaning. In investigating dance thusly i hope to show the importance of perspective. One way to understand dance is as a study of perspective the perspectives of the dancers of the audience and of the choreographer; the perspectives of an engaged party and of a detached observer; the perspectives from under the skin and from outside from within and from without.

        Specifically i try to place the insights given in scientific physiological accounts typically third-person as well as those of the phenomenological and experiential sort first- and second- person in the context of one another integrating them into a framework based upon the themes of movement experience and mind. What do we see when we see dance what do we feel when we dance who are we when we are part of an enactment of dance the phenomenon of dance brings to the fore key ideas about the nature of human meaning-making the role of our fundamentally corporeal actions in the world and the foundational aspects of our experiences. Dance i contend holds immense promise as an object for study as well as a subject of study that is a source of insight in itself shedding light on life movement and meaning. In investigating dance thusly i hope to show the importance of perspective. one way to understand dance is as a study of perspective the perspectives of the dancers of the audience and of the choreographer; the perspectives of an engaged party and of a detached observer; the perspectives from under the skin and from outside from within and from without.

           Specifically i try to place the insights given in scientific physiological accounts typically third-person as well as those of the phenomenological and experiential sort first- and second- person in the context of one another integrating them into a framework based upon the themes of movement experience and mind. What about the nature of the human form allows this unlike other arts dance leaves no trace no record. It is the art that is contained completely and totally in the present. It is only fully present at the moment of its creation. It gives you no manuscripts to store away no paintings to show in museums or to hang on walls no lines of words to be printed and sold nothing but the fleeting moment manifest in its unfolding. Before man expressed himself with pictures before he had words to say before he had letters to write on a page he had his body. The nature of dance itself is written into the human form.

         The bipedal body is an essential condition for dance the dance of bees and the dance of leaves in the wind notwithstanding.Bipedalism enables exceptionally high degrees of biomechanical freedom. The possibilities for movement are simply more numerous. Bipedal bodies have more unconstrained parts parts that are freely moving or that have the potential to move. Having but two appendages occupied in a basic standing posture leaves the rest unencumbered with holding the weight of the body up. These can move independent of the support of the bodily trunk as in waving or stretching ones arms. Upright torsos are also positionally unconstrained in the fact that they are partially self-supporting. Torsos can twist and rotate; heads swivel and angle; arms can swing and arc. Upright positionality also allows for degree of freedom in the weighting moving and throwing of the legs as in kicking or wheeling one leg about. Guadrapedal animals can certainly move about in a variety of gaits the gallops and trots of a horse for example but they are physiologically constrained by the ultimate need to support a horizontally elongated torso a spinal column that is directly tethered to the quadrapedal structure of movement.

 

         A bipedal body structure hence allows for more degrees of freedom in the expressive and sense as well. The human form allows for selection from a palette of possibilities for movement. These possibilities are based upon the qualitatively corporeal nature of dance which in turn reflects the corporeal nature of our understanding of the corporeal meaning we find in ourselves and others. An examination of how the human form makes use of the quality of movement to create meaningful forms shall be the aim of this paper.

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